Question
20 apr 2018

  • Giapponese
  • Inglese (Stati Uniti)
  • Tailandese
Domande Inglese (Stati Uniti)

After all, I realized that this is not even a question but is more of a discovery I made: I'm probably narrow-minded by nature and some people are, too.

In the United States, you are supposed to speak in English, otherwise, people might feel bothered and give you an unpleasant look. That's the heads-up an American once gave me, and I kind of got shocked at it.

I've been to many countries, except for the States, where at times I encounter foreign people who talk loudly in their own native tongue. I find it rude and arrogant, so in this regard, I understand how some Americans might feel about foreigners and immigrants in the States. That being said, as far as I know, in many other countries, most people don't really care about what language someone speaks, and foreigners and immigrants openly speak in their own language.

https://youtu.be/nSDc4CPEvE0
This might be an extreme example, but the way of thinking that a part of American people share seems to reflect on it. Last year, in a Starbucks in the states, an American woman told some other customers talking in Korean that she didn't want to hear them speaking in Korean there and people in the States are supposed to speak in English. Actually, I somehow understand her feelings at the moment, but still this was a jaw-dropping story to me.

In the near future, Japan will probably accept a significant number of immigrants and the society will dramatically change and face many issues associated with immigrants. From the perspective of some American people, the immigrants living in Japan are supposed to speak in Japanese, but from my own, it doesn't hold true. I'm pretty sure that Japanese people would not expect them to speak in Japanese unless it matters, like in workplace. Rather, it would personally be bothering when I encounter foreigners and immigrants speak broken Japanese loudly and fluently, and see their Japanese becoming the new standard. Now that think about that American woman, perhaps I'd be acting towards foreigners and immigrants that way.

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  • Inglese (Stati Uniti)

  • Inglese (Stati Uniti)
[Novità] Ehi tu! Dico a te che stai imparando una lingua!

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After all, I realized that this is not even a question but is more of a discovery I made: I'm probably narrow-minded by nature and some people are, too.

In the United States, you are supposed to speak in English, otherwise, people might feel bothered and give you an unpleasant look. That's the heads-up an American once gave me, and I kind of got shocked at it.

I've been to many countries, except for the States, where at times I encounter foreign people who talk loudly in their own native tongue. I find it rude and arrogant, so in this regard, I understand how some Americans might feel about foreigners and immigrants in the States. That being said, as far as I know, in many other countries, most people don't really care about what language someone speaks, and foreigners and immigrants openly speak in their own language.

https://youtu.be/nSDc4CPEvE0
This might be an extreme example, but the way of thinking that a part of American people share seems to reflect on it. Last year, in a Starbucks in the states, an American woman told some other customers talking in Korean that she didn't want to hear them speaking in Korean there and people in the States are supposed to speak in English. Actually, I somehow understand her feelings at the moment, but still this was a jaw-dropping story to me. 

In the near future, Japan will probably accept a significant number of immigrants and the society will dramatically change and face many issues associated with immigrants. From the perspective of some American people, the immigrants living in Japan are supposed to speak in Japanese, but from my own, it doesn't hold true. I'm pretty sure that Japanese people would not expect them to speak in Japanese unless it matters, like in workplace. Rather, it would personally be bothering when I encounter foreigners and immigrants speak broken Japanese loudly and fluently, and see their Japanese becoming the new standard. Now that think about that American woman, perhaps I'd be acting towards foreigners and immigrants that way.
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